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This week in W.Va. history

Jul. 01, 2013 @ 12:15 AM

The following events happened on these dates in West Virginia history. To read more, go to e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia, a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council, at www.wvencyclopedia.org.

June 30, 1914: Prohibition became the law in West Virginia.

June 30, 1929: The Wheeling Symphony Orchestra gave its first concert at Oglebay Park.

July 1, 1861: Francis Pierpont, governor of the Reorganized Government of Virginia, called the legislature into session. The general assembly re-established governmental functions, provided for the raising of military units, and elected new U.S. senators and representatives.

July 1, 1937: Watoga State Park was opened to the public on July 1, 1937. The park in Pocahontas County is the largest of the state parks.

July 1, 1971: Southern West Virginia Community College was formed by joining the Marshall University branch campuses at Logan and Williamson. In 1995, the name changed to Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College.

July 3, 1863: At Gettysburg, Union troopers in the 1st West Virginia Cavalry took part in a fruitless cavalry charge against Confederate infantrymen during the waning moments of that great battle.

July 4, 1882: The steamboats Scioto and John Lomas collided on the Ohio River as they were returning from holiday excursions. The Scioto sank almost instantly, and 70 people drowned.

July 4, 1918: Poet Muriel Miller Dressler was born in Kanawha County. Her poem ''Appalachia,'' published in 1970, was her signature piece.

July 4, 1928: West Virginia dedicated Droop Mountain Battlefield State Park. Droop Mountain was the site of one of the most important Civil War battles fought on West Virginia soil.

July 4, 1938: Musician Bill Withers Jr., was born into a miner's family of 13 children in Slab Fork, Raleigh County. In 1971, Withers released his first album, "Just As I Am," including his first Grammy-winning song, ''Ain't No Sunshine.''

July 5, 1950: Army Private Kenneth Shadrick of Wyoming County was the first U.S. serviceman killed in action in the Korean War.

July 6, 1806: Statesman Charles James Faulkner was born in Martinsburg. Faulkner served in the West Virginia legislature, U.S. Congress (1851-59), and as U.S. minister to France.

July 6, 1883: Judge ''R. D.'' Bailey was born at Baileysville, Wyoming County. Bailey came into wide prominence as the judge of the Matewan Massacre trial in 1921.

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