6 pm: 75°FPartly Sunny

8 pm: 73°FSunny

10 pm: 69°FClear

12 am: 64°FClear

More Weather

Lost Huntington

Jul. 14, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: The Enslow mansion

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 34th in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


Jul. 06, 2014 @ 08:45 PM

Lost Huntington: The old city market

HUNTINGTON — In 1912, the Huntington Chamber of Commerce published a booklet portraying life in “a home-like, hospitable, progressive, busy, clean, pretty, young city, of about 40,000 people.” While picturing what the city had to offer prospective new businesses or other newcomers, the booklet also cited improvements yet to come.


Jun. 30, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: The Buffington Mill

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 32nd in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


Jun. 23, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: Pleasant View Manor

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 31st in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


Jun. 16, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: The Hotel Huntington

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 30th in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


Jun. 08, 2014 @ 10:26 PM

Lost Huntington: Lock and Dam No. 28

HUNTINGTON — When the first settlers arrived in the Ohio River Valley they found a river that, as one settler famously described it, seemed in some places “a mile wide and a foot deep.”  Travel on the river was possible only when heavy rains or snow melt provided a surge of water. When steamboats debuted on the river, they often had to tie up for days or even weeks awaiting a surge of high water.


Jun. 02, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: 317 9th St. Building

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 28th in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


May. 26, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: Huntington Hospital

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 27th in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


May. 19, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: Bradshaw-Diehl

Editor's note: This is the 26th in a series of articles recalling vanished Huntington landmarks.


May. 12, 2014 @ 12:00 AM

Lost Huntington: Oley Elementary

HUNTINGTON -- Union Gen. John Hunt Oley was elected recorder and treasurer in the new city of Huntington's first election. As recorder, he was in charge of the city's schools and is considered the father of public education in Huntington.