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NCAA clears Tulsa in AD gambling case

Apr. 11, 2013 @ 12:00 AM

TULSA, Okla. -- The University of Tulsa said Wednesday it faces no punishment from the NCAA for sports betting violations allegedly committed by the school's now-fired athletic director.

Tulsa said the collegiate governing body's investigation into how the school handled the case involving Ross Parmley yielded a secondary violation.

The NCAA defines secondary violations as "isolated or inadvertent" events that "occur frequently and are usually resolved administratively." An NCAA spokeswoman declined to comment on Tulsa's secondary violation Wednesday, instead referring questions to the school.

Tulsa said the NCAA determined that its swift firing of Parmley and enhancement of its in-house education policies regarding sports wagering was enough, said Don Tomkalski, an athletic department spokesman.

"We felt good about the actions that were taken and what the university did," Tomkalski said Wednesday. "We're just excited to get things moving. This is something that's behind us."

Tulsa President Steadman Upham said in a statement Wednesday that the university "maintains the highest commitment to following NCAA policies and regulations among our administration, coaches and student athletes."

"The university's priority remains to provide our student athletes with the opportunity to compete at the highest level, while making progress toward completion of their degree in an environment consistent with high academic standards, a commitment to equity and diversity, sportsmanship, personal growth and development, and ethical conduct," Upham said in the statement.

Parmley was fired in December, a week after he was named in a federal investigation of Teddy Mitchell, who is accused of running a major gambling operation in Oklahoma City and is scheduled to go on trial later this year.

In unsealed court documents last year, Parmley was described as an "admitted gambler with Mitchell."

A message seeking comment from Parmley's attorney was not returned late Wednesday.

The night Parmley was fired, Upham released a letter to students and faculty of the private university, saying Parmley "admitted he had not been truthful" about his role in the mess when he told him in October 2011 that he was cooperating in an FBI investigation.

"At that time, Ross told me that his involvement was solely due to a family connection to the person being investigated," Upham said in the letter."

Upham had said Parmley told him he wasn't personally involved in the root of the investigation.

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