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In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, Albert Chow, owner of Great Wall Hardware in San Francisco, holds a May 2019 letter from a supplier notifying him that prices will be increasing 10 to 18 percent because of US tariffs on Chinese goods. He says he has no choice but to raise store prices on those products. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump's trade war with China, until now mainly an abstraction for American consumers, is about to hit home.

Beginning Sunday, the U.S. government will begin collecting 15% tariffs on $112 billion in Chinese imports — items ranging from smartwatches and TVs to shoes, diapers, sporting goods and meat and dairy products. For the first time since Trump launched his trade war, American households face price increases because many U.S. companies say they'll be forced to pass on to customers the higher prices they'll pay on Chinese imports.

For more than a year, the world's two largest economies have been locked in a high-stakes duel marked by Trump's escalating import taxes on Chinese goods and Beijing's retaliatory tariffs.

The two sides have held periodic talks that seem to have met little progress despite glimmers of potential breakthroughs. All the while, they've imposed tariffs on billions of each other's products in a rift over what analysts say is Beijing's predatory tactics in its drive to become the supreme high-tech superpower.

American consumers have so far been spared the worst of it: The Trump administration had left most everyday household items off its tariff list (valued at $250 billion in Chinese products so far) and instead targeted industrial goods.

That's about to change. When Trump's new tariffs kick in at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, 69% of the consumer goods Americans buy from China will face his import taxes, up from 29% now.

That isn't all. Higher tariffs are set to kick in for another batch of Chinese products - $160 billion worth - on Dec. 15. By then, roughly 99% of made-in-China consumer goods imported to the United States will be taxed, according to calculations by Chad Bown of the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Overall, Trump's trade war will have raised the average tariff on Chinese imports from 3.1% in 2017, before the hostilities began, to 24.3%.

"The bottom line is that, for the first time, Trump's trade war is likely to directly raise prices for a lot of household budget items like clothing, shoes, toys, and consumer electronics," Bown wrote in an report.

This has become an ever-more-difficult decision. After years of ultra-low inflation, consumers have grown more resistant to price hikes, especially when they can easily compare prices online for household products and choose the lowest-price options. For that reason, many retailers may choose not to impose the cost of Trump's higher tariffs on their customers.

Still, the prices of certain goods will cost Americans more. Trump tacitly acknowledged this a few weeks ago by announcing a delay in his higher tariffs on $160 billion in imports until Dec. 15 - to keep them from squeezing holiday shoppers.

Even before the December tariffs, though, 52% of shoes and 87% of textiles and clothing imported from China were to be hit by Trump's tariffs, according to Peterson's Bown.

And not even counting the increase - from 10% to 15% - that Trump announced for his new tariffs a week ago, J.P. Morgan had estimated that his import taxes would cost the average household roughly $1,000 a year.

Retailers, engaged for a battle for survival with Amazon and other e-commerce rivals, are bracing for the worst. Macy's raised an alarm when it reported earnings in August: In May, Trump had raised separate tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods from 10% to 25%. In response, Macy's tried to raise prices of some items on the hit list - luggage, housewares, furniture. But according to CEO Jeff Gennette, customers just said no.

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