This story appeared in The Herald-Advertiser on Sunday, Nov. 15, 1970.

Gov. Arch A. Moore Jr. stood at the scene and listened as names of non-team members were read to him.

"No -- Oh, God. No. This can't be happening. Why do these things have to happen? These people are our friends."

The state's chief executive, after leaving the scene, said it would probably be eight or nine hours before the bodies can be taken, not until daybreak can a thorough search be conducted.

Special identification teams from the State Police in Charleston are en route to the scene, the governor said, and they will conduct investigation processes on the bodies.

"All that have been found are burned beyond recognition," he said. The bodies will be removed to an airport hangar, and National Guard trucks and other emergency vehicles were available to transfer the bodies.

The governor said some reports indicated the plane hit a hillside west of the runway, bounced off and exploded in mid-air before crashing.

Other reports said the plane first exploded, then hit the hillside, bounced into the air and then crashed.

Harry Hatten, who owns a farm on the other side of the hill, and his family were out in the barnyard at the time of the crash, and saw the plane and remarked, "It's flying too low."

They then saw a flash of fire.

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